PHANTOM PAIN

 

 

Phantom pain, also referred to as “phantom limb pain”, refers to pain felt in the area where a limb has been amputated. This pain can vary from mild to severe. Although the limb is no longer there, the nerve endings at the site of the amputation continue to send pain signals to the brain that make the brain think the limb is still there. 


Doctors once believed this post-amputation phenomenon was a psychological problem, but experts now recognize that these real sensations originate in the spinal cord and brain. Phantom sensations usually will disappear or decrease over time; however, when phantom limb pain continues for more than six months the prognosis for improvement is poor.

In addition to pain in the phantom limb, some people experience other sensations such as tingling, cramping, heat, and cold in the portion of the limb that was removed. Any sensation that the limb could have experienced prior to the amputation may be experienced in the amputated phantom limb. Although phantom pain occurs most often in people who've had an arm or leg removed, the disorder may also occur after surgeries to remove other body parts, such as the breast, eye or tongue.


In the end, Phantom Pain is a type of neuropathic pain. If you are tired of your phantom pain interfering with your quality of life, we’re confident we have just what you need. Please fill out the medication request form below and take the first step toward relief.

 

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